Tony Booth – Workin’ at the Car Wash Blues

Written and recorded by Jim Croce. The song "Workin' at the Car Wash Blues" was covered by American country singer Tony Booth in 1974, the same year as Jim Croce's single

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Tony Booth - Workin' at the Car Wash Blues
Cover LP Tony Booth Capitol 1974
Tony Booth – Workin’ at the Car Wash Blues, is a 1974 single written and recorded by Jim Croce. It was the third single released from his album I Got a Name. It reached a peak of #32 in July 1974, on the Billboard Hot 100. It is Croce’s last Top 40 hit to date. It was also the fourth single released, including Christmas-themed release “It Doesn’t Have To Be That Way”, after Jim Croce’s death in September 1973.
The song “Workin’ at the Car Wash Blues” was covered by American country singer Tony Booth in 1974, the same year as Jim Croce’s single. It was also covered by Jerry Reed on his tribute album Jerry Reed Sings Jim Croce.




Tony Booth – Workin’ at the Car Wash Blues
Album: Workin’ at the Car Wash Blues
B-Side: That Loving Feeling
Sello: Capitol Records – 3943
Formato: Vinilo, 7″, 45 RPM
Publicado: 1974
Género: Folk, World, & Country
Estilo: Country
Songwriter(s) Jim Croce
Producer(s) Jim Shaw
COUNTRYPEDIA





Tony Booth – Workin’ at the Car Wash Blues

Tony Booth (born February 7, 1943) is an American country music singer who participated in Buck Owens’ “Bakersfield sound” revolution.
As a boy, Booth showed his talent by winning a contest in New Port Richey, Florida, for playing guitar at age 14. After high school, he attended the University of New Mexico with the intent of becoming a schoolteacher. But he decided to give music a try, and began his music career with the Mel Savage Band. Before long, he was touring with Jimmy Snyder.
Booth’s first single, “Wishful Thinkin'” (backed with “I Think I Can”) and album, Country ’67 was released under the stage name “Johnny Booth” by Universal City Records in 1967. It featured a cover of Engelbert Humperdinck’s “There Goes My Everything”, a version of which had been released months earlier by Ray Price, one of Booth’s longtime influences. The album, produced by Cliffie Stone, retains the vestigal sound of Rockabilly that country music was moving away from at that time, ironically toward the softer sound then being pushed by artists such as Price.
When his first album did not yield a chart position, Booth formed a band called Modern Country in 1968 and performed for a time in Las Vegas, Nevada before moving to Los Angeles, California. The band, which renamed itself the Tony Booth Band, became the house band at L.A.’s Palomino Club. He cut a single with K-Ark Records, “Big Lonely World” (backed with “It’s Alright”) but it also had no chart success.

WIKIPEDIA

Tony Booth - Workin' at the Car Wash Blues
Single Tony Booth Capitol 1974
SourceWikipedia
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