Don Edwards – Coyotes

100 Greatest Western Songs of All Time ! The Great American Country network named Coyotes as one of their Top 20 Cowboy and Cowgirl Songs; Members of the Western Writers of America chose it as one of the Top 100 Western songs of all time.

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Don Edwards - Coyotes
Cover LP Don Edwards Warnet Western 1996

Don Edwards – Coyotes, ​is an American Western song written by Bob McDill and closely associated with cowboy singer Don Edwards. It appears on Edwards’ 1993 album Goin’ Back to Texas, and was featured on the soundtrack of the 2005 documentary film Grizzly Man.

The Great American Country network named Coyotes as one of their Top 20 Cowboy and Cowgirl Songs; Members of the Western Writers of America chose it as one of the Top 100 Western songs of all time. In a 2010 interview with Cowboys & Indians magazine, Edwards said “Bob McDill wrote the song in 1984 or ’85 and couldn’t pitch it to anyone. He put it in a drawer in his office and forgot about it until we started recording at Warner Brothers.”



The song is a story of what happens to a man when the world as he knows it and worked in it begins to disappear. Among the things that the protagonist says “are gone” are nineteenth-century people, animals and concepts that contemporary listeners may not be familiar with: Pancho Villa, longhorns, drovers, Comanches, outlaws, Geronimo, Sam Bass, the lion, the red wolf, Quantrill (sounds like Quantro in the song, (one version he says Quanah Parker, who was a Comanche. So what sounds like Quantro may be Quanah) and Stand Watie. In the end, the protagonist is gone, too.
TOP 100 WESTERN SONG





Don Edwards – Coyotes lyrics

Was a cowboy I knew in south Texas
His face was burnt deep by the sun
Part history, part sage, part Mexican
He was there when Pancho Villa was young

And he’d tell you a tale of the old days
When the country was wild all around
Sit out under the stars of the Milky Way
And listen while the coyotes howl

They go, boo-yip, boo-yip, boo
Boodi-boo-yip, boo-doo-yip, boo-doo
Boo-yip, boo-yip, boo
Boodi-boo-yip, boo-doo-yip, boo-doo

Now the longhorns are gone
And the drovers are gone
The Comanches are gone
And the outlaws are gone
Geronimo’s gone
And Sam Bass is gone
And the lion is gone
And the red wolf is gone

Well he cursed all the roads and the oilmen
And he cursed the automobile
Said, “This is no place for an hombre like I am
In this new world of asphalt and steel.”
Then he’d look off someplace in the distance
At something only he could see
He’d say, “All that’s left now of the old days:
Those damned, old coyotes and me.”

And they go, boo-yip, boo-yip, boo
Boodi-boo-yip, boo-doo-yip, boo-doo
Boo-yip, boo-yip, boo
Boodi-boo-yip, boo-doo-yip, boo-doo

Now the longhorns are gone
And the drovers are gone
The Comanches are gone
And the outlaws are gone
Now Quantrill is gone
Stand Watie is gone
And the lion is gone
And the red wolf is gone

One morning, they searched his adobe
He disappeared without even a word
But that night, as the moon crossed the mountain
One more coyote was heard

And he’d go, boo-yip, boo-yip, boo
Boodi-boo-yip, boo-doo-yip, boo-doo
Boo-yip, boo-yip, boo
Boodi-boo-yip, boo-doo-yip, boo-doo
GENIUS

SourceWikipedia
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