Terry Bradshaw – Jambalaya (On the Bayou)

Terry Bradshaw is an American football player, TV host, occasional singer, and actor. He covered the song "Jambalaya (On the Bayou)". Bradshaw's cover of "Jambalaya (On the Bayou)" was released in 1978 along with his cover of "Four Walls".

Terry Bradshaw’s take on Hank Williams’ classic «Jambalaya (On the Bayou)»

Terry Bradshaw – Jambalaya (On the Bayou)

Terry Bradshaw - Jambalaya (On the Bayou)
Terry Bradshaw
Terry Bradshaw is an American football player, TV host, occasional singer, and actor. He covered the song «Jambalaya (On the Bayou)» which was written by Hank Williams and and was first recorded and released by Hank Williams with His Drifting Cowboys in 1952. Bradshaw’s cover of «Jambalaya (On the Bayou)» was released in 1978 along with his cover of «Four Walls».

Original Song

Jambalaya (On the Bayou) is a song written and recorded by American country music singer Hank Williams that was first released in July 1952. It is Williams’ most recorded song. Named for a Creole and Cajun dish, jambalaya, it spawned numerous recordings and has since achieved popularity in several different music genres.

Hank Williams – Jambalaya (On the Bayou)




History Of Jambalaya

Dish of Jambalaya
Dish of Jambalaya
The dish Jambalaya is a Louisiana-born dish that has its origins in West African and Central African cuisine. Gullah creoles were the first group of African slaves to prepare the dish. Red rice was brought to America by West and Central Africans during the Trans-Atlantic slave trade. Jambalaya has influences of Spanish, French, African, Native American, and Caribbean cooking styles and produce. Perhaps the most obvious of these is Spanish, due to the dish’s similarity to paella, which was brought to New Orleans by foreign explorers. In the case of Creole jambalaya, tomatoes may have been added by Spanish cooks as a substitute for saffron which is used in paella. The French probably added spices brought from the Caribbean while Cajun cooks used meat caught in the bayous. The dish saw a surge in popularity during the 1930s due to the economic downturn; many people could barely afford to eat and so the simple recipe of vegetables and rice was a filling choice. Until recently, cooking in Louisiana was mainly restricted to the local area, resulting in such a breadth of variations of the dish. Each family will have their recipe for jambalaya that has been proudly passed down through each generation, with very little adaptation.

COUNTRYPEDIA

Terry Bradshaw – Jambalaya (On the Bayou), Live on Pop! Goes The Country 1977




Hank Williams – Jambalaya (On the Bayou) Lyrics

[Verse 1]
Goodbye Joe me gotta go me oh my oh
Me gotta go pole the pirogue down the bayou
My Yvonne the sweetest one me oh my oh
Son of me gun we’ll have big fun on the bayou
Jambalaya and a crawfish pie on a filé gumbo
‘Cause tonight I’m gonna see my ma cher amio
Pick guitar, filled fruit jar and be gay-o
Son of me gun we’ll have big fun on the bayou
[Verse 2]
Thibodaux Fontaineaux the place is buzzin’
Kinfolk come to see Yvonne by the dozen
Dressed in style, go hog wild, oh me oh my oh
Son of me gun we’ll have big fun on the bayou
Settle down far from town get me a pirogue
And I’ll catch all the fish in the bayou
[Chorus]
Jambalaya and a crawfish pie on a filé gumbo
‘Cause tonight I’m gonna see my ma cher amio
Pick guitar, filled fruit jar and be gay-o
Son of me gun we’ll have big fun on the bayou
Jambalaya and a crawfish pie on a filé gumbo
‘Cause tonight I’m gonna see my ma cher amio
Pick guitar, filled fruit jar and be gay-o
Son of me gun we’ll have big fun on the bayou
Son of me gun we’ll have big fun on the bayou
[Verse 3]
Later on, swap my mon, get me a pirogue
And I’ll catch all the fish on the bayou
Swap my mon, to buy Yvonne what she need-oh
Son of a gun we’ll have big fun on the bayou
Jambalaya and a crawfish pie…

GENIUS




Terry Bradshaw - Jambalaya (On the Bayou)
Single Hank Williams MGM 1952
BUY Single
BUY Single
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